xmantel {ecodist}R Documentation

Cross-Mantel test

Description

Simple and partial cross-Mantel tests, with options for ranked data and permutation tests.

Usage

xmantel(formula = formula(data), data, dims = NA,
   nperm = 1000, mrank = FALSE)

Arguments

formula

formula describing the test to be conducted. For this test, y ~ x will perform a simple Mantel test, while y ~ x + z1 + z2 + z3 will do a partial Mantel test of the relationship between x and y given z1, z2, z3. All variables should be either non-symmetric square cross-dissimilary matrices of class xdist, or vector forms thereof.

data

an optional dataframe containing the variables in the model as columns of dissimilarities. By default the variables are taken from the current environment.

dims

if the dissimilarity matrices are not square, the dimensions must be provided as c(nrow, ncol)

nperm

number of permutations to use. If set to 0, the permutation test will be omitted.

mrank

if this is set to FALSE (the default option), Pearson correlations will be used. If set to TRUE, the Spearman correlation (correlation ranked distances) will be used.

Details

If only one independent variable is given, the simple Mantel r (r12) is calculated. If more than one independent variable is given, the partial Mantel r (ryx|x1 ...) is calculated by permuting one of the original dissimilarity matrices. Note that the cross-dissimilarity functions are for research purposes, and are not well-tested.

Value

mantelr

Mantel coefficient.

pval1

one-tailed p-value (null hypothesis: r <= 0).

pval2

one-tailed p-value (null hypothesis: r >= 0).

pval3

two-tailed p-value (null hypothesis: r = 0).

Author(s)

Sarah Goslee

See Also

xdistance, xmgram

Examples

data(graze)

### EXAMPLE 1: Square matrices

# take two subsets of sites with different dominant grass abundances
# use cut-offs that produce equal numbers of sites
dom1 <- subset(graze, POPR > 50 & DAGL < 20) #  8 sites
dom2 <- subset(graze, POPR < 50 & DAGL > 20) #  8 sites

# first two columns are site info
dom.xd <- xdistance(dom1[, -c(1,2)], dom2[, -c(1,2)], "bray")

# environmental and spatial distances; preserve rownames
forest.xd <- xdistance(dom1[, "forestpct", drop=FALSE], 
    dom2[, "forestpct", drop=FALSE])
sitelocation.xd <- xdistance(dom1[, "sitelocation", drop=FALSE], 
    dom2[, "sitelocation", drop=FALSE])

# permutes rows and columns of full nonsymmetric matrix
xmantel(dom.xd ~ forest.xd)
xmantel(dom.xd ~ forest.xd + sitelocation.xd)

plot(xmgram(dom.xd, sitelocation.xd))


### EXAMPLE 2: Non-square matrices

# take two subsets of sites with different dominant grass abundances
# this produces a non-square matrix

dom1 <- subset(graze, POPR > 45 & DAGL < 20) # 13 sites
dom2 <- subset(graze, POPR < 45 & DAGL > 20) #  8 sites

# first two columns are site info
dom.xd <- xdistance(dom1[, -c(1,2)], dom2[, -c(1,2)], "bray")

# environmental and spatial distances; preserve rownames
forest.xd <- xdistance(dom1[, "forestpct", drop=FALSE], 
    dom2[, "forestpct", drop=FALSE])
sitelocation.xd <- xdistance(dom1[, "sitelocation", drop=FALSE], 
    dom2[, "sitelocation", drop=FALSE])

# permutes rows and columns of full nonsymmetric matrix
xmantel(dom.xd ~ forest.xd, dims=c(13, 8))
xmantel(dom.xd ~ forest.xd + sitelocation.xd, dims=c(13, 8))

plot(xmgram(dom.xd, sitelocation.xd))

[Package ecodist version 2.0.9 Index]